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“The best of deeds in this month [Ramadan] is to restrain oneself from all that Allah, Mighty and Exalted, has prohibited.” —Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)

The protection of the rights of all human beings, irrespective of race, color, creed, nationality, or language, is central to any conception of justice. The state of human rights in a nation is directly related to national and international security, and this indicates that justice is a condition for security and peace. Justice can be defined as the morally correct state of persons and their affairs. It is a virtue enjoined by religions and honored by the wisdom of generations.

The 2013 CEDAW report reveals quite contrary facts bout the condition of women and their political participation under the Al Khalifa regime. Here is a review of the most recent condition of Bahraini women and their political and public life.

One of the many strange paradoxes promoted for decades in the Western narrative on the Islamic Republic of Iran - consistently repeated by so-called "Iran experts", government officials, and the Western propaganda machine in general - is that Iran is growing increasingly unstable and unpopular (if not imploding), yet simultaneously it is on the rise and its "menacing" influence can be felt throughout the region and beyond.

Some studies estimate that close to 1.5 million Iraqis have lost their lives as a result of the brutal American invasion and occupation of their country in 2003.  Millions more Iraqis have become refugees and orphans with no future prospects for prosperity, sanctity or stability.

Muslim propagandists are nowadays making extraordinary efforts to change the image of Islam by reintroducing it to the Western society as a religion that calls for peace and rejects violence.

Nuclear terrorism was first identified by the United States as a unique concern at the Washington "Nuclear Security Summit" of April 12-13, 2010.

The issue of Hijab is not a new topic and it is as old as the Abrahamic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

The famous slogan of the Jan. 25th Revolution (Egypt, 2011) was – and still is – `Iish, Hurriyyah, `Adalah Ijtima`iyyah (literally, Bread, Freedom, and Social Justice!) respectively.

“You don’t need this.” These are the words that will probably always represent my first experience with hijab. Though I was only four years old and in kindergarten, my mother would cover my hair with a headscarf before I left to school each morning. My former Christian parents accepted Islam the year I was born, and they wanted their children to be known as Muslims when they went to American public school.

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